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Yoruba language going into extinction, Afenifere laments

The pan-Yoruba socio-political and cultural organisation, Afenifere, has lamented that the Yoruba language, especially among children, is gradually being eroded in the South West. The…

The pan-Yoruba socio-political and cultural organisation, Afenifere, has lamented that the Yoruba language, especially among children, is gradually being eroded in the South West.

The organisation raised the concern at the end of its caucus meeting held at the residence of its foremost leader, Pa Rueben Fasaoranti, on Thursday, in Akure, Ondo State. 

Dare Ajayi, the spokesperson of Afenifere, who addressed journalists shortly after the meeting, revealed that the organisation was worried about the status of the Yoruba language.  

Ajayi, who noted that many parents refused to speak and teach their children the language, said, “It’s of great concern to the meeting that many parents are not speaking let alone teaching their children, and it will create a danger of extinction shortly.

“The meeting, therefore, encourages all parents not to only speak the language in their homes, but also to teach their children. 

“The meeting calls on the government, particularly in Yoruba-speaking states, to make it a policy and probably even make it compulsory for the language to be used as a medium of expression and teaching at the primary school level and up to the junior secondary school.”

He added that part of the deliberations at the meeting was the concerns raised by some South West governors over the lack of access to farming facilities and loans. 

He explained that farmers who were on a Save Our Soul (SOS) visit to the Afenifere leader, pleaded with him to intervene by talking to the governors to provide them loans to boost productivity to shore up food security. 

He noted that the farmers also raised concerns about the neglect of farming, which they observed was gradually going into extinction in the South West.