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The link between bra and breast cancer

Now note that bras do not cause the cancer initially but they restrict the flow of lymph within breast tissue, thereby hindering the normal cleansing…

Now note that bras do not cause the cancer initially but they restrict the flow of lymph within breast tissue, thereby hindering the normal cleansing process of the breast tissue. Experts say many environmental toxins and pesticides that cause and promote cancer are “fat-loving” and so tend to reside in the breast tissue.  Lymph fluid carries away waste products, dead cells and toxins.

Breast cancer is a complex disease, and many other things besides bra wearing contribute to it.  The following points explain some other things you can do to help prevent breast cancer.

Eat diets rich in fruits and vegetables

Most people already know about the importance of fruits and vegetables in preventing disease, since they contain antioxidants, vitamins, minerals – and special compounds named photochemical, many of which fight cancer and other diseases.  Many common spices (garlic, curry, hot pepper) also are good sources of photochemical.

Vitamin D and sunlight

According to William B. Grant’s analysis, breast cancer risk could be cut in half by sufficient vitamin D levels – or in other words, by sufficient sun exposure. In a study done in the USA, breast cancer mortality rates vary according to the geographic region so that the highest rates are in the northeast and urban areas, and lowest rates in the south and rural areas.  This is explained by the variation in sunlight and the subsequent vitamin D production.  

Carbohydrates, obesity  and breast cancer

Obesity has long been recognized as a risk factor for breast cancer.  Recent research is starting to unveil a bigger picture where obesity, a condition called insulin resistance, higher estrogen levels, and insulin-like growth factor are all connected, and act synergistically.  The exact causal mechanism is yet uncertain and under study.

Ann Kulze, M.D. and author of Dr Ann’s 10-Step Diet (Top Ten Wellness and Fitness, October 2004) designed steps to show you how you can prevent breast cancer in your life. Here are some of the points.

1. Maintain a healthy body weight (BMI less than 25) throughout your life. Weight gain in midlife has been shown to significantly increase breast cancer risk. Additionally, and elevated BMI has been conclusively shown to increase the risk of post-menopausal breast cancer.

2. Minimize or avoid alcohol. Alcohol use is the most well established dietary risk factor for breast cancer. The Harvard Nurses’ Health study, along with several others, has shown consuming more than one alcoholic beverage a day can increase breast cancer risk by as much as 20 to 25 per cent.

3. Exercise regularly the rest of your life. Many studies have shown that regular exercise provides powerful protection against breast cancer. Aim for 30 minutes or more of moderate aerobic activity.

4. Do your fats right! The type of fat in your diet can affect your breast cancer risk. Minimize consumption of omega-6 fats (sunflower, safflower, corn and cottonseed oils), saturated fats and trans fats. Maximize your intake of omega-3 fats, especially from oily fish (salmon, tuna, mackerel, sardines, lake trout and herring). Consume monounsaturated oils (canola, olive oil, nuts/seeds, and avocados) as your primary fat source, as these foods have potential anticancer properties.

5. Consume whole food soya beans products regularly, such as roasted soya nuts, soya milk.  Epidemiologic studies have shown a positive association between soy consumption and reduced breast cancer risk. The fact that Japanese consume soya and have very low breast cancer rates is often used to ‘prove’ that soya can help prevent breast cancer.