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Sallah: Prices of rams, commodities soar in Jos, Kano

As Muslims around the world prepare for the 2022 Eid el-Adha, the prices of rams and other commodities have risen significantly in Plateau and Kano…

As Muslims around the world prepare for the 2022 Eid el-Adha, the prices of rams and other commodities have risen significantly in Plateau and Kano States.

At the Yanshanu Market in Jos when our correspondent visited, there were rams but with high prices, with the market’s Chairman, Namadina Sarki Zango, confirming the hike in prices.

 

He said a ram that was sold at N30,000 last year went for between N50,000 and N60,000 now, noting that it was applicable to sheep too.

Idris Musa, who bought a ram at N60,000, said, “This year’s price is very high compared to last year’s. I just bought it because there is nothing I can do.”

Residents of Jos say the high prices of rams will make most people not buy one for this year’s Sallah.

In Kano, residents are shocked about how prices of items bought during the Eid el-fitr could rise high within just two months.

Sani Hussaini, a civil servant, said most people had accepted the hardship being experienced but that the trend of rising prices was alarming, especially towards the Sallah.

He said, “To be fair, even the marketers are contributing because they believe the demand is high now and they want to maximize the profit at the expense of the people.”

Adamu Aminu, a labourer and father of three, said, “Everything has changed, even sachet water is more expensive than before, let alone what to eat. You can’t cook red soup now because the tomatoes we used to buy for N500 are now N1,500.”

At the Yankaba Market in Kano, a basket of tomatoes rose to N30,000 from N5,000 two months ago while a 50kg sack of pepper now sells for N30,000, rising from N8,000 a few months ago.

A trader, Gambo Muktar, said, “Honestly, the reason for the high prices is that the items are scarce right from the farms, and we don’t have them here in Kano.”