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IPMAN shuts filling stations in Adamawa

All filling stations in Adamawa State have been forcibly closed by the Independent Petroleum Marketers Association of Nigeria (IPMAN), leaving schoolchildren and commuters stranded in…

All filling stations in Adamawa State have been forcibly closed by the Independent Petroleum Marketers Association of Nigeria (IPMAN), leaving schoolchildren and commuters stranded in their attempts to reach their destinations.

This drastic action follows IPMAN’s accusations against the Nigeria Customs Service of intimidation and the illegal seizure of tankers and petroleum products.

With fuel shortages affecting transport services, the few available tricycle (Keke) riders hiked fares by up to 200 per cent, rendering transportation unaffordable for many residents.

Civil servants and students are among the worst affected, expressing frustration over the escalating situation.

Critics have condemned IPMAN’s decision, suggesting that the association should focus on preventing the illegal diversion of petroleum products rather than shutting down essential services.

IPMAN, on the other hand, maintains that customs officers are conducting unlawful operations, harassing their members and causing significant financial losses.

Earlier, IPMAN had issued a 72-hour ultimatum to the Nigerian Customs Service, demanding adherence to legal procedures to avoid further disruptions that could lead to industrial actions within the petroleum supply chain.

Currently, Adamawa State is experiencing minimal vehicular movement as a result of the situation.

 

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