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How I reformed over 1000 drug addicts in Kaduna – Malam Nigga

Rigasa is one of the densely populated communities in Kaduna metropolis. In the middle of the area is a rehabilitation centre run by Muduru, whose…

Rigasa is one of the densely populated communities in Kaduna metropolis. In the middle of the area is a rehabilitation centre run by Muduru, whose action was informed by hatred for drug abuse and addiction. It was gathered that the increasing rate of mental retardation among the youth prompted him to establish a reformation centre. The youth are consequently trained on sskills to make them self-reliant entrepreneurs.
Sunday Trust observed that, apart from the youth – male and female – the elderly are among those being reformed at the centre. The inmates are children of the poor and the rich, including a child of a serving governor.
The name of the centre is Niggas Rehabilitation and Skills Acquisition and Training Centre, with the motto: The sad end of drug abuse.
Alhaji Muduru was nicknamed Malam Nigga, meaning that he is the teacher of drug addicts. Our investigation revealed that the centre was established in March, 2006. Since then, he has graduated over 1000 former addicts who have been fully transformed and reintegrated into the society.
It was further discovered that presently, the centre has about 250 inmates; among them are 12 females.
One of the inmates, who hails from Zaria, Ibrahim Mukhtar, holds a bachelor’s degree in Public Administration from the American University, Egypt. He recounted his ordeal to our reporter thus: “I am a junkie. I started taking cigarettes, weed and hard drugs about four years back. I graduated into cocaine through the influence of bad friends or peer group while I was studying in the American University in Egypt. When I came back to Nigeria, I did my mandatory youth service, after which I secured a job in a private firm. I am married with two children.
“I was brought here because my situation was deteriorating. I have spent nine months here. I am under rehabilitation and undergoing counselling and skills acquisition. I am now in the computer section of the centre.” Mukhtar advised youths to avoid hard drugs as they lead to mental retardation.
Another addict, Muhammad Abubakar, who bagged a National Diploma in Nigeria before proceeding to Malaysia for a degree programme, revealed that he had spent four months in the centre after he was brought home from the Malaysian-Canadian University.  
“I started taking cigarettes, then weeds, and later graduated to hard drugs. We would buy the drugs outside the campus and go inside the school to get ‘high’.”
He said that when he came back to Nigeria, his family came to his rescue by bringing him to the rehabilitation centre. Abubakar added that he is now the assistant head of the computer section after the instructor, Mr. Timothy Musa.
He called on other youths to steer clear of hard drugs, warning, “If a drug addict does not have somebody to bring him here, he may get mad. Avoid drugs and be good to the society. I am now reformed. My people may come to pick me any moment from now.”
Also recounting her ordeal, one of the 12 female drug addicts at the centre, Sumayya Muazu, who said she had just concluded her secondary education at Adeyemo College, Kaduna revealed, “I was introduced to hard drugs by peers. The drugs include codeine, shisha and others. My friends and boyfriends got them for me. My family later realised my addiction and brought me here. I have spent few months now in the centre. I am learning how to knit, sew, make air-freshener and others.
“I am advising the youth to be disciplined and obedient to their parents.”
Similarly, another inmate, Maryam Muhammad said: “I was involved with drugs such as codeine, cigar and others. I take the drugs when I am disturbed and it makes me ‘cool’. My parents observed my deteriorating health and they brought me here. I am now learning knitting, sewing and how to make antiseptics. I am calling on ladies and women not to engage in drugs. I am now regretting it. It is not a good character.
In the administrative structure of the centre, head boys and girls are given the power to discipline any erring student. The centre has rules and regulations that must be obeyed.
The proprietor of the centre revealed that the inmates are trained on tailoring, knitting, barbing, welding, generator repairs, aluminum smelting, manicure and pedicure, entrepreneurship skills, computer education, carpentry and dying.
Malam Nigga, who said he was neither a drug addict nor attended any formal training on reform, said his concern for the younger generation drove him to the venture. He uses locally made big chains to restrain them.
Asked if he receives support from government he said, “I have never received any support from any tier of government. I am financing the centre from the sales of the goods produced here, as well as income from the parents of some wealthy inmates. I foot their medical bills, buy fuel for the generators, shoulder the running cost of materials and tools, sanitation, feeding, amongst many others. I have just installed a big screen television with satellite connection for the leisure of the inmates.”

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