How Abuja community is coping with darkness for over 70 years | Dailytrust

How Abuja community is coping with darkness for over 70 years

The only borehole serving the Gosa Kpanyi-Kpanyi in Abuja Municipal Area Council

In less than three years, more than 20 people have been killed while crossing the airport road in Abuja from Gosa village in order to go and charge their telephones in neighbouring communities due to lack of electricity in the village.

Daily Trust reported in 2019 how the community in Nigeria’s capital city had fared without electricity since its establishment over 70 years ago.

Mr Amos Gyayibwa, the Chief of Gosa Kpanyi-Kpanyi, told Daily Trust that since the inception of the community it had never been connected to the national grid.

Mr Gyayiwa said, “Everything is proving difficult here; we have to cross the airport expressway to go and charge our phones; which is bad. More than 20 people have lost their lives while crossing the expressway to either charge their phones or children going to school in a neighbouring community.

“Also, had it been we have electricity we would be watching television and be informed about national and international issues. We’re not connected to the world at all.”

He, however, said a contractor fixed a transformer in the community and promised to connect the community after the recent Sallah, but that since then nothing had been heard from him.

The chief also said, “We need a borehole here because the one we have is not sufficient for us due to the rising population.

“There’s no health facility and school; we are in dire need of these amenities.’’

Daniel Baba, secretary of the community, corroborated the chief’s position, saying they were not well informed about the electricity project.

Mr Baba also said the only borehole that the community of nearly 2,000 population depended on was sunk only last year, which he noted was not sufficient.

He said, “In July 2021, we had a serious outbreak of cholera where more than 30 people were affected and one died. Thanks to some health workers in the community who are always there to help when there’s an outbreak.

“We, therefore, appeal to the government to look at our situation, to halt the needless loss of the lives of our people and connect us to the national grid. We also need sufficient potable water and a clinic.”

Several efforts to get the reaction of the chairman of the Abuja Municipal Area Council (AMAC) on the plights of the community proved abortive as he could not be reached up till Tuesday evening.