11 books every Nigerian child must read | Dailytrust

11 books every Nigerian child must read

Children reading

One of the ways to shape a child’s mind is encouraging them to read books.

Many successful people today, admit to a childhood replete with regular and wide reading.

Studies have shown that reading exercises the brain, improves concentration, teaches children about the world around them and improves their vocabulary and language skills.

It also develops a child’s imagination, helps children to develop empathy and above all, reading is fun!

It is the dream of every parent to see their children grow into well-balanced and successful adults. It is therefore their responsibility to lay the best foundation and help their children form healthy habits. Reading is a great way to start.

Here are 11 evergreen books by Nigerian authors for your child in both primary and secondary schools. Which of them have you read?

Sugar Girl by Kola Onadipe
Raila is missing from home under mysterious and unfortunate circumstances. Thereafter, she goes through ordeals, one after the other: First in the hands of a wicked witch and then a hunter. Will she survive these ordeals and return home…and under what circumstances?

Eze goes to school by Onuora Nzekwe

Eze is determined to go to school but this is not easy. Can he overcome the difficulties that stand in his way?

The drummer boy by Cyprian Ekwensi

A Talented blind drummer boy and singer moved from place to place entertaining people with his performance. But deep down there is an undisclosed unhappiness. Why is Akin unhappy? Who among his friends can he trust in his search for true happiness?

 Flying Tortoise by Anezi Okoro
Okoro takes on the classic folktales of Igbo culture in this novel. For the first time, Tortoise leaves his home on earth to explore outer space, taking on environmental problems and the timeless themes of mankind and society.

 How the Leopard Got Its Claws by Chinua Achebe and John Iroaganachi
Recounts how the leopard got his claws and teeth and why he rules the forest with terror.

Koku Baboni by Kola Onadipe
Koku, one of a set of twins is customarily abandoned and left to perish. Is it right to do that? What about our Human Right to Live? Did he survive the ordeal…and what was the result of his experience?

The Village Headmaster by Anezi Okoro
The Village Headmaster is the new broom at the village school. His efforts to ‘sweep clean’ meet opposition and disaster in this sequel to The Village School.

Chike and the river by Chinua Achebe

The more Chike saw the ferry-boats the more he wanted to make the trip to Asaba. But where would he get the money? He did not know. Still, he hoped. Eleven-year-old Chike longs to cross the Niger River to the city of Asaba, but he doesn’t have the sixpence he needs to pay for the ferry ride. With the help of his friend S.M.O.G., he embarks on a series of adventures to help him get there.

Without a Silver Spoon by Eddie Iroh
It tells the story of Ure Chokwe’s determination to go to school in spite of his poor background.

Burning Grass by Cyprian Ekwensi
A tale of family ties in a nomadic tribe of Northern Nigeria.

Akula the Black Bird by S.C Njoku
In this Nigerian tale, the new yam festival of the bird kingdom is approaching and Miss Akula, who thinks her black feathers look ugly and dirty, seeks the help of friends to become white, shiny, and the envy of other birds.